Sulphur cap countdown

With 2020 rapidly approaching, much of the shipping industry is trying to ascertain what the International Maritime Organisation's 2020 sulphur cap means for them. As one of the most important regulations to ever hit the maritime world, it will have an impact across the shipping ecosystem, from boardrooms to engine rooms and brokers to seafarers. Given the scale of the impact, many stakeholders are worried about what it means for their business, while some are also anticipating it could deliver them bumper profits. The Fairplay team will be tracking the key developments as we approach 2020, highlighting the risks and opportunities of this momentus change for our industry.  

News & Analysis

VLCCs
19 Sep 2018
A predicted recovery in the next few weeks would mirror the rebound in 2016 when freight rates for VLCCs soared from about USD15,000/day to about USD64,000/day two months later. 
Tallink’s new ro-pax ferry, Megastar
27 Feb 2018
With 2020’s 0.5% sulphur fuel limit looming, the shipping sector can look at how the Baltic Region is managing after its 0.1% limit came into force in 2015.
Container ships vessel with scrubber
13 Feb 2018
Insurance broker Marsh has warned shipownerss that non-compliance with sulphur rules will bring costs and delays.
Sveinung Oftedal, chair of PPR5 (right) alongside IMO general secretary Kitack Lim
07 Feb 2018
Delegates at the IMO are keen that the sulphur cap regulation is applied to all operators equally so no one can gain a competitive advantage. The Pollution Prevention and Response subcommittee has set up working groups that will define how the sulphur cap will achieve this equality of application and report to the MEPC in April.
22 Jan 2018
Market distortion and unfair competition fuel shipowner concerns on enforcing the 2020 global sulphur cap
Emissions at the port of Rotterdam
15 Jan 2018
Marsh warns that shipowners could find that their vessels are deemed unseaworthy and their insurance cover is affected by failing to comply with more stringent sulphur emissions (SOx) regulations set to be introduced on 1 January 2020.